Vaccinated

I received my COVID-19 vaccine today. The Pfizer one was offered to me and I took it. I feel a bit like I did after Election Day this year – ready for a big sigh of relief.

I still remember how we stumbled around COVID in the early days of the pandemic at my hospital. We weren’t quite sure what the precautions should be. When my first patient showed up, having just flown in from China, I went into the room alone, wearing an N95 mask and gown. But we still didn’t wear masks or eye protection in the workrooms and all other patient encounters were routine protocol. I remember the first time a COVID test was run on a patient I had seen on the inpatient service. My colleague called her daughter’s school and they asked her to pick her up. I was so worried that I had been exposed and would be exposing my whole family. Fortunately, that patient tested negative. I remember clinics shutting down completely and being converted to video. A few patients still wished to be seen in person and I would go in to see them. I brought my own Lysol wipes from home and wore scrubs every day. Hair up, N95 on, surgical mask over the N95, face shield in place. I would avoid my children when I arrived home and jump straight into the shower. I was so worried that I would contract COVID while pregnant – so worried that I stopped seeing patients at 34 weeks and took a full month of prepartum leave. At the time, all of these precautions seemed temporary and we thought we’d be up and running full throttle by the summer. And yet, here we are 9 months later.

One disclaimer here is that I am primarily an outpatient physician. I see oncology patients and do round regularly in the hospital on our consult patients, but I am not on the front line (emergency room, ICU, COVID units, etc.). I am in complete awe of the physicians, nurses and hospital staff who have been on the front line this entire time. I do not have it in me to do what they did. My patient population is primarily healthy, but there was still so much fear around pre-symptomatic patients coming to clinic, colleagues coming to work before diagnosis, etc.

All this to say that getting this vaccine was a big deal for me. It was a sign of hope – hopefully the beginning of the end. Although I plan to wear PPE the entire time I am at work, I feel reassured that I am less likely to contract COVID if I am exposed. Although we don’t have the data, I am also hoping that this means I am less likely to transmit COVID if exposed (again, this wasn’t studied, so we won’t know for some time). I am still nursing but decided that the risks to my infant of getting COVID were greater than any theoretical risks related to vaccine administration. I hope that by the time the general public has the opportunity to be vaccinated, we have more information to power the decision-making process. I am not the type of person who jumps on the bandwagon for new therapeutics, but as I always tell my patients who are interested in a new therapy or intervention – you have to weigh the risks against the alternative, not the ideal. Do I wish that we were not in the middle of a pandemic that has kept us away from our families for the past 9 months, kept my kids out of school for much of the year, led us all to wear masks and stay 6 feet apart and completely crippled our social interactions? Of course. But the fact of the matter is that we are in the middle of a pandemic and I will be working through it. It made sense to me to add a layer of protection by receiving the vaccine. And hopefully this truly is the beginning of the end and we can start moving towards relative normalcy sometime in 2021.

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